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More CBers than Hams

Discussion in 'General Ham Radio Discussion' started by oldgeezer, Aug 14, 2017.

  1. BlowinSmoke

    BlowinSmoke
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    It's very simple, when asked him to provide a call sign, he can't. A search of his name on the FCC site or QRZ turns up nothing. Rest assured he is not.


     

  2. fourstringburn

    fourstringburn
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    W9WDX Amateur Radio Club Member K5KNM

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    … or the friend is really him.
     
  3. BlowinSmoke

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    If you are talking about me, I never said he was a friend, because he isn't.
     
  4. fourstringburn

    fourstringburn
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    W9WDX Amateur Radio Club Member K5KNM

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    Just check'n.
     
  5. nomadradio

    nomadradio
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    Back in the dark ages, the only way to look up someone's call sign to get a name and address was a publication called the "Radio Amateur Callbook". Looked like a phone book.

    To bootleg a legit-sounding callsign, you went down one page of callsigns to look for a gap in the alphabetic sequence. At least you weren't "borrowing" a call sign that belonged to someone else.

    That way, if someone got suspicious and looked up your bogus callsign, you could say "Just got this license. Must be too new to be in the last callbook printing."

    That trick won't work these days.

    73
     
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  6. StrangeBrew

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    I know guys who use a ham rig for cb and just like to listen in on the ham bands sometimes, are you sure he transmits?
     
  7. BlowinSmoke

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    Yes I am sure he transmits. He told me so.
     
  8. DainBramage

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    Well, Lets see,..................................... you don't believe him when he says he has a call, but,... you do believe him when he says he transmits.

    Too much DRAMA for me,... I'm out
     
  9. wavrider

    wavrider
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    Ham bands have their share of boot leggers, pirates.
    Many here in the states, and other countries.

    If you have time to SWL you can hear some interesting transmissions.

    Also "Freeband" is not just for 11 meter frequencies.

    Google freeband and you will see some in the lower freqs get used also.

    Either way if he does not have a call sign he is not supposed to transmit on amateur bands.
    Not illegal to own any type of amateur equipment, but is required to have a license to operate it for transmitting purposes.

    With that there is also many many ops using amateur radio equipment for 11 meter DX, Europeans have some fantastic stations all dedicated to 11 meter free band, using amateur equipment.
     
  10. BlowinSmoke

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    No doubt. My question remains, who do people that do not have call signs talk to on 75 and 40 meters? Unless they bootleg another hams call without them knowing. OR...do a group get together and talk to each other on the ham bands themselves and not talk to legal hams? This guy has a distinguish voice and I will be able to picl him out if I hear him on the ham bands. I just have to listen until I come across him.
     
  11. Tallman

    Tallman
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    W9WDX Amateur Radio Member, KW4YJ EXTRA class

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    They talk to other pirates and some hams don't care if the station is legitimate or not.
    14.313 MHz is a good example.
     
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  12. fourstringburn

    fourstringburn
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    W9WDX Amateur Radio Club Member K5KNM

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    I suspect 3840 Khz is the same.
     
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  13. Tallman

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    W9WDX Amateur Radio Member, KW4YJ EXTRA class

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    Probably the same crew.
     
  14. wavrider

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    blowin skoke
    You answered your own question.
    He talks to who ever will reply.
    Not ALL amateurs look up every call sign to who ever that talk to.
    Hell I have not looked up a call in forever.
    If DX comes in ok I make the contact, but I don't chase it.
    If I am rag chewing on what ever band I identify as per regulations but I am just rag chewing.
    If it is a pirate then he is using someone's call sign how am I to know?
    If I do think the other op is a pirate then I just say my 73's and end the QSO.
     
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